Golf 101 Book -Table of Contents

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1 - GOLF BASICS - What is Golf? / About Golf Courses / Keeping Score

CHAPTER 2 - GOLF EQUIPMENT - Clubs / Glove / Shoes / Bag / Ball Retriever / Ball Marker / Ball Repair Tool / Tee / Umbrella / Towel

CHAPTER 3 - GOLF INSTRUCTION - The Grip / Aiming / Posture / Putting / Chipping / Pitching / Full Swing / Sand Shots

CHAPTER 4 - PREPARING FOR THE GOLF COURSE - Safety / Etiquette / Rules

CHAPTER 5 - PLAYING GOLF ON THE COURSE - Booking a tee time / The 30 minute Warm Up / Playing Golf / Mental Skills / The Final Shot

The Table of Contents page was creatively designed with the key ball flights built into the image.

The ball flight laws state that there are nine types of golf shots you can hit. The straight shot, straight hook, straight slice, pull, pull hook, pull slice, push, push hook and push slice.

What is a straight shot? It is a ball that flies straight to your target with no curvature at all.

What is a pull and push shot? For a right handed golfer, a pull shot is a ball that flies straight left of your target. A push shot is a ball that flies straight right of your target. It is the opposite directions for a left handed golfer.

What is a hook and slice? For a right handed golfer, a hook is a ball that curves to the left and a slice is a ball that curves to the right. It's the opposite curvature for a left handed golfer. A hook that curves a smaller amount (usually less than 15 yards) can also be called a draw. A slice that curves a smaller amount can be called a fade.

The Ball flight laws are created by the club's path and face to path at impact. Assuming a right handed golfer and center contact, if a club's path is straight and the face is square to the path at impact, the ball will fly straight. If the path is straight and the face aims left of the path at impact (closed), the ball will pull hook and if the path is straight and the face aims right of the path at impact (open), the ball will push slice.

Assuming a right handed golfer and center contact, when the club's path is left or right of the target and the face is square to the path, the ball will pull or push respectively. If the path is left or right of the target and the face isn't square to the path, the ball will either hook or slice.

The starting direction of the ball is mostly determined by the direction the face is aiming at impact. The path does have some influence on the starting direction of a golf ball but usually only up to a 20% influence.

The reader of Golf 101 with Bob Dimpleton doesn't have to think much about the key ball flights as the table of contents page clearly shows the club's path and face to path at impact and the resulting shot shape it produces.